Excerpt from my book 'Mindfulness in Knitting' to go with the confused weather today.

'In the simplicity of the great white light all colour lives.' 

Winifred Nicholson (1893–1981), pioneering painter of abstract colour

Light through prism on banana yarn.

Light through prism on banana yarn.

Colours cannot be classed as good or bad, only as ‘true’. Nature teaches us that the colour spectrum works in perfect harmony, and through playing with the placement of colours we find their affinity with each other. Mindfully noticing this reminds us how our own energies and emotions balance. 

Rainbows sit soundless, triumphantly displaying the colours that reside in the rest of nature. There may even be more colours that we cannot yet see. As light moves around, the colours around us darken, lighten, and play wonderful games. The rainbow’s translucent colours may fade, but for that short time they beguile us into finding a more permanent luminosity elsewhere. The rainbow hints at colours that are hidden in flora and fauna, waiting to be extracted as natural pigments. The rainbow is always beautiful, and there is no colour within it that does not bring us at some time a deep sense of wonder or contentment. 

Colour depends not only on the quality of light under which we see it, but also on the ability of our eyes to truthfully receive the colour. When we are unconscious in the present, or feeling low, we might not perceive the power of colour. Even on the brightest days we might see only the separation of colour, and its degrees of light and shade, but not the full experience it offers our eyes. When we are alert and feeling perceptive, the differentiation of colours deepens and exciting things start to happen. Colours dance, changing each other by their juxtapositions. Some colours radiate, while others withdraw into themselves.

Back at the wool stash, we can investigate the abstract quality of our emotions by carefully arranging yarns, letting them form relationships that hint at our mood. We do not need to clarify that mood intellectually, as the colour spectrum is not an intellectual scale. Find colour stories that satisfy different moods, take you out of your safety zone and evoke a sense of freedom. 

 

 

Psychologies Magazine Review

Here is a review of my new book 'Mindfulness in Knitting' In Psychologies Magazine.  You can win a free copy of it if you act fast! Win it and that could be one Christmas Present for a knitting aunty crossed off the list. Follow this link....

https://www.psychologies.co.uk/win-copy-mindfulness-knitting

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Dry Stone Walling with Alan Titchmarsh

Here is a picture from the green room at the Alan Titchmarsh show.

When you go on telly these days you have to wear extra make up because of the high definition screens. If the telly width is now up to 110 inches, and they are filming you up close, then your pimples could be as much as half an inch, if your not carefull...

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So they literally use an airbrush to flatten your face. Here it is being loaded with foundation cream.

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I was invited to show Alan my knitted dry stone wall, alongside Ingrid and her giant needles, and Helen from up north who knitted tea time and was very nervous. We were there as support for Pauline McLynn who was staring in a comedy at the Globe Theatre, and was wanting to talk about her knitted tea cosies which she sells. I think Pauline is a genius. She played Mrs Doyle on Father Ted. 

Here is ~Pauline helping Ingrid with her giant knitting. 

Mike Rutherford from Genesis was there too talking about his new book. I got confused and thought I knew him from the French House pub in Soho, so got too embarrassed to ask for his autograph. Here is a picture of Mike which I lifted off the internet. 

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Strange world television. I don't think anyone I know saw it, but I'm not sure. Its an experience. Its culture, and culture is good. We went to see Pauline in her play at Globe Theatre shortly afterwards and that was amazing.  

Preparing for Yan Tan Tethera Sampler Culture Clash at Cecil Sharp House home of the English Folk Dance and Song Society...

It's kind of impossible to tell the whole story with David Littler's Yan Tan Tethera show. Everyone in it had doors opened into their own heritage, whatever that was..Roswitha Chesher made a film which skimmed the surface of the project with great depth, here http://www.textilefolksong.co.uk/

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The Yan Tan Tethera project culminated in a live performance from sonic arts collective sampler-cultureclash as they unite Gaelic song with spinners, weavers and knitters, and traditional and electronic musicians in an exploration of things that spin. My knitting machine produced waves, slow and fast, crunchy waves, with some green space dyed seaweed stripes in Herdwick during the rehearsals.

The Yan Tan Tethera project culminated in a live performance from sonic arts collective sampler-cultureclash as they unite Gaelic song with spinners, weavers and knitters, and traditional and electronic musicians in an exploration of things that spin. My knitting machine produced waves, slow and fast, crunchy waves, with some green space dyed seaweed stripes in Herdwick during the rehearsals.

Knit a Door to Enter or Leave....

Apply to something, Knit to open, knit to close. Here is a pattern for a door. A paneled door, option one,  one way up;  option two,  the other way up.  Work in one, two or more colours. 

Taken from my pattern book of knitted charms, made for Yan Tan Tethera at Cecil Sharp house with David Littler 2014. From the song, 'Off Jumps Jack.'